Why Liberal Arts Majors Wouldn’t Want to Live on a Space Colony


Think about what life in a space colony would be like: a hermetically sealed, climate-controlled little nothing of a place. Refrigerated air, synthetic materials, and no exit. It would be like living in an airport. An airport in Antarctica. Forever. When I hear someone talking about space colonies, I think, that’s a person who has never studied the humanities. That’s a person who has never stopped to think about what it feels like to go through an average day—what life is about, what makes it worth living, what makes it endurable. A person blessed with a technological imagination and the absence of any other kind.

All in a Dream," William Deresiewicz (The American Scholar)

Tallis’s Daily Hallucinating Delusional Syndrome


If I told you that I had a neurological disease which meant that for eight or more hours a day I lost control of my faculties, bade farewell to the outside world, and was subject to complex hallucinations and delusions – such as being chased by a grizzly bear at Stockport Railway Station – you would think I was in a pretty bad way. If I also claimed that the condition was infectious, you would wish me luck in coping with such a terrible disease, and bid me a hasty farewell.

Of course, sleep is not a disease at all, but the condition of daily (nightly) life for the vast majority of us. The fact that we accept without surprise the need for a prolonged black-out as part of our daily life highlights our tendency to take for granted anything about our condition that is universal. We don’t see how strange sleep is because (nearly) everyone sleeps. Indeed, the situation of those who do not suffer from Tallis’s Daily Hallucinating Delusional Syndrome is awful. They have something that truly deserves our sympathy: chronic insomnia.

- “Notes Towards a Philosophy of Sleep,” Raymond Tallis

Your Emotions Are a Gauge, Not a Guide


God designed your emotions to be gauges, not guides. They’re meant to report to you, not dictate you. The pattern of your emotions (not every caffeine-induced or sleep-deprived one!) will give you a reading on where your hope is because they are wired into what you believe and value — and how much. That’s why emotions like delight (Psalm 37:4), affection (Romans 12:10), fear (Luke 12:5), anger (Psalm 37:8), joy (Psalm 5:11), etc., are so important in the Bible. They reveal what your heart loves, trusts, and fears. At Desiring God we like to say pleasure is the measure of your treasure, because the emotion of pleasure is a gauge that tells you what you love.

- Jon Bloom, Desiring God

Victor Davis Hanson on Candor and Culture


Culture — not race, geography, or location — is the greatest factor in economic, and military, dynamism. It used to be that the classically liberal view focused on culture — because it was not race-based and often is a volatile and fluid concept that can be changed. For example, the economy of contemporary China came to resemble Taiwan’s rather than Taiwan’s emulating 1960s China. Few believe that a unique micro-geography in North Korea explains why its way of life differs from the South, or that climate ensures that Tijuana is a very different place from San Diego, or that the differences between East and West Germany were due to genetic or racial variables, or that China between 1964 and 2012 underwent climate change. “Western” does not denote a race, but rather a set of values and protocols that originated in Athens, Rome, and Jerusalem and were adopted, modified, and expanded through the next two millennia of European history — and are undergoing radical changes as we speak.

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/313003/candor-and-culture-victor-davis-hanson

Lesley Gore- “You Don’t Own Me”

Aloe Blacc - “I Need a Dollar”

How to Cheat on High-School History Tests

Esperanza Spalding - “Fall In”

Crooked Still - “Half of What We Know”

Don’t You Eva Interrupt Me While I’m Reading a Book!